Blood Cancer In America:

New Health Union survey data helps the healthcare industry better understand and reach people living with blood cancer

For the third year in a row, Health Union has gathered patient-reported data from thousands of real people impacted by blood cancer. The third annual Blood Cancer In America survey quantifies the true impact of this condition among patients – going beyond basic demographics and symptoms to establish a deep understanding of the holistic patient journey for those affected and to track trends over time.

The new data from the third annual Blood Cancer In America survey reveals deep insights of a population of 1,919 people, with an average age of diagnosis of 58.5, who have been diagnosed with the following types of blood cancer: 30% multiple myeloma, 28% leukemia, 27% lymphoma, 10% MPN, and 5% MDS or other. Fifty-eight percent of respondents feel satisfied with their current treatment plan* and 41% of those in remission say they have a survivorship care plan.

Blood Cancer Patient Data
Blood Cancer Patient Data
Blood Cancer Patient Data

The experiences of the blood cancer community are unique and impact people of many different ages. Of those survey respondents who were diagnosed at age 40 or older, they offered advice to those who who have been newly diagnosed. One person wrote, “Learn everything you can about your cancer. Always list questions for your oncologist so you stay in the know and on top of your disease. Chronic fatigue was the absolutely the worst part of my disease, so do what you can, when you can, let go of perfection and it is okay to do less.

This access to a broad base of knowledge, facts and data gleaned from Health Union’s open online health communities like Blood-Cancer.com, and syndicated research allows the healthcare industry to harness the power of Health Union’s continuous immersion in the patient experience to deliver smarter insights and implications–so you can spend your time developing the strategies that will make a difference.

*Top 2 box on a 7-pt scale